Your Essential Guide to CBD

  • 1 Comment

Get to know the good leaf, where it comes from and discover its most essential elements

Cannabis is a fascinating plant that has been used throughout history for its healing qualities. While the earliest recorded use of medicinal marijuana was in 2737 BC in China, historic evidence shows its use in ancient Rome, Egypt and India.

In more recent times, Napoleon was said to have brought it back from Egypt in 1798 for its pain-relieving and sedative qualities.

In the U.S., cannabis was widely utilised as a patent medicine during the 19th and early 20th centuries, described in the United States Pharmacopoeia for the first time in 1850.

Early editions of American medical journals noted that hemp seeds were effective at treating venereal disease, incontinence, and inflamed skin. This was further popularised in the U.S. by the Irish doctor William O’Shaughnessy, who worked as a physician for the British East India Company.

Check out this map of the 6000-year history of medical Cannabis

Historic map of cannabis
https://www.visualcapitalist.com/history-medical-cannabis-shown-one-giant-map/

As the use of medical cannabis developed from O’Shaughnessy’s findings, more and more treatments began to utilise its medicinal properties for easing the symptoms of a range of conditions, including cholera, tetanus, and rabies. The popularity of medical marijuana grew exponentially until 1906 with the introduction of the Pure Food and Drug Act, which changed attitudes to cannabis largely because of the abuse of morphine. In 1914 the Harrison Narcotics Tax Act was introduced and the consumption of drugs was made a crime. The introduction of the Marihuana Act 1937 outlawed the non-medical use of cannabis completely. Marijuana was now criminalised with harsh penalties for its consumption or sale.

While public perception changed in the Sixties and Seventies through it widespread recreational use, the Eighties saw another crackdown as the ‘War on Drugs’ halted any progress into the medicinal benefits of cannabis.

While medicinal uses of cannabis, including hemp-derived products like CBC, remain illegal in many countries, attitudes are changing as more and more anecdotal evidence is reported and research reveals its positive effects on a variety of conditions.

What we know so far is that its many parts and constituents have shown remarkable potential to help everything from anxiety to pain management, sleep to skin care.

Hemp

Hemp is a strain of the Cannabis sativa plant that is grown specifically for the industrial and therapeutic uses of its derived products. Hemp contains less than 0.3% of the psychoactive THC and higher concentrations of cannabidiol (CBD), which decreases or eliminates its psychoactive effects. It’s commercial uses include clothing, rope, paper as well as CBD oils. Hemp-derived CBD is what you’ll find in all products at goodleaf.

Cannabinoids

Cannabinoids are chemical compounds that make up the Cannabis plant. There are over 113 unique cannabinoids, CBD and THC being the most well-known and studied. Both are unique cannabinoids with separate properties and offer an array of therapeutic benefits. They work by imitating compounds our bodies naturally produce, called endocannabinoids, which activate to maintain internal stability and health.

CBD

CBD stands for cannabidiol, which is a type of cannabinoid, and is a non-intoxicating chemical compound extracted from the Cannabis sativa plant. CBD is the compound responsible for the overwhelmingly positive side effects and benefits of Cannabis, whereas THC is solely responsible for the ‘high’. While CBD can have many great side effects (aiding in sleep, pain relief, and easing anxiety) our CBD will not get you high.

THC

The psychoactive cannabinoid in Cannabis that affects the chemical receptors in the brain and nervous system that control mood, appetite, memory, pain sensations, and psychoactive perception. THC is the cannabinoid responsible for the ‘high’ produced by traditional marijuana. You can rest assured that THC is not present in any goodleaf product.

Terpenes

Terpenes are aromatic oils that are responsible for the wide variety of fragrant flavours and smells in Cannabis. Scientists have identified over 200 terpene varieties. They have powerful aromatherapy and mind-calming benefits – without any psychoactive qualities so you won’t feel any ‘high’. Terpenes and cannabinoids work together in harmony, resulting in an ‘entourage effect’ which enhances the potential healing properties of Cannabis.

Cannabis and your body

Did you know that there is a system in our bodies comprised of receptors that interact exclusively with cannabinoids like CBD and THC? These active ingredients in Cannabis directly interact with a complex network of receptors in the human body called the Endocannabinoid System (ECS).

Think of it as a system of docking sites located in the brain and throughout the body, specifically designed to interact with cannabinoid-type substances. The receptors in the ECS are the most prevalent neuro-receptors in the brain and are prolific in the immune system, organs, bones and skin.

The cornerstone of CBD as medicine is based on how it works with our body’s Endocannabinoid System (ECS).

How safe is CBD, really?

As interest in CBD grows and the market becomes flooded with CBD products, there are a few preliminary questions you should ask:

  • Where was the Hemp grown (continent, country, state, local area?) Where was the product processed? Was is lab-tested by an independent third party?
  • How was the CBD extracted?
  • What is the amount of CBD in each dosage? Do they fall under the legal threshold? (Your recommended daily dose is 20mg of CBD)
  • Is it 100% THC free? (ie, does it contact 0.3% THC or less?
  • What other ingredients are listed? There shouldn’t be a long list of other stuff.

What’s the best way to take CBD?

There are a variety of ways for you to consume CBD, most commonly: drops (tinctures), capsules and softgels, vapes, topicals (creams and balms), food and beverages (teas etc) and even suppositories.

Tagged with: Guide

Older Post Newer Post

1 Comment

  • concisely, clearly, effectively communicated. thx.

    K Shein on

Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published